Okane, sister restaurant of Omakase, offers approachable and delicious Izakaya-style dining

Okane's Hamachi dish
Fresh Hamachi? Yes, please.

I had the absolute pleasure of dining at SOMA’s now Michelin-starred Omakase last year and was so excited to hear that their team has opened a new casual dining space right next door. Okane is where you want to go if you’re looking for an authentic izakaya dining experience serving hyper traditional Japanese dishes and drinks. A few months after they opened, the restaurant offered a peek into the space and menu.

My friend and I came for a visit after work one day and were greeted with the sounds of Naughty by Nature and Biggie Smalls over the sound system and two glasses of bubbly. If that isn’t a total Bay Area dining experience, then I don’t know what is.

Okane's sushi roll
Okane’s Harajuku roll was delicious and super fresh.
Okane wagyu roll
The Shinjuku roll is definitely a treat for anyone.

We started our meal with some cold sake and beautiful pieces of Shimofuri Hamachi served with an olive oil yuzu shoyu drizzle and jalapeño. The Harajuku roll was delicious and was a roll of salmon, avocado and shrimp tempura topped with tuna, spicy kabayaki and fried lotus root chips. We also indulged in the Shinjuku, a roll of snow crab and avocado, topped with torched wagyu beef, garlic and pepper.

Okane's eel tempura
Who knew Eel Tempura could be so good?

The fish courses that followed were the Saba Karaage, a fried piece of mackerel with daikon and serrano peppers; the Grilled Sake Lees Cured Alaskan Cod; and the Anago Tempura, fried pieces of eel stacked with burdock root and tentsuyu, a Japanese tempura dip. All were delicious and offered a peak into the many fish preparations on the menu.

After a couple palate cleansers of Chawanmushi and roasted seaweed rice with savory tea broth, we both dove head first into a bowl of Black Sesame Ice Cream with a drizzle of Okinawa brown sugar sauce. The meal was totally well-rounded, the fish tasted like it was just caught, and the service was perfect. Not to mention, some of the ingredients are flown in from Tokyo’s famed Tsukiji Fish Market.

Traditional Japanese dining can be pretty intimidating, whether you’re just learning how to use chopsticks or are seasoned eaters looking for more adventurous dishes. The team at Okane, led by vet restauranteur Kash Feng, is making omakase and izakaya-style dining more approachable…while also delicious.

For more information, visit www.okanesf.com.

 

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